Why Jon Finley Supports Trump for President
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Why this Conservative Supports Trump

Conservative American Explains why he’s Voting for Donald Trump in 2020 [VIDEO]



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Two years ago, back before Covid was even a dot on the horizon, I packed my bags and headed off to the USA. While I was there I took a road trip through the land of whiskey, rock and roll, and southern twangs; Tennessee. At a small, roadside café in Cornersville, I met Jon Finley. We’re at opposite ends of the political spectrum, and he was supporting Republican President Donald Trump in the 2020 elections, after doing the same in 2016. With the election coming up, I decided to try and get out of my liberal bubble and see the American elections from a Trumpier perspective. So, I gave him a call. The text below is a transcript of our full discussion, covering everything from his faith, to why he supports Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential elections.

Please note that I do not fact-check my interviewees, and that their views do not represent my own.

What does your faith mean to you?

“It’s very important to give me a standard, a base and a backbone for my life, and for my family’s life… there has to be a standard of right and wrong somewhere. There has to be a basis of absolute. There has to be an absolute zero, and the Bible gives me that, and my Christian faith gives me that. It’s where I start my life from.”

See Jon's Full Answer

I’m a Christian; a member of the Church of Christ. I don’t believe in denominationalism. That’s one of those things… denominations come about because people can’t agree. The truth is the truth, and when people can’t  agree to accept the truth, then they branch off… and I’m not saying that the Church that I belong to is perfect. But I do know that any time you have denominations of anything, it becomes watered down, and then it’s people’s opinions. My faith is very important because I hold the bible to be true. My faith is that the Bible is the truth, and that it doesn’t matter what I think, or what anybody else thinks, it’s always true. We can excuse it, and we can make all manners of ideas and suggestions… but it’s truly the Bible that dictates what is right, what’s wrong and what is true. My faith is important because it gives me purpose, gives me an understanding of life. If you don’t have an absolute truth, an absolute that I use the Bible as, then you’re left with, “ok, what is the almighty? Where do we get our gifts from? I don’t know.” If you’re a non-believer, did we just evolve from nothing? It’s very important to give me a standard, a base and a backbone for my life, and for my family’s life. I try to instil in my family the tenets of the Christian faith. And they understand that it doesn’t matter if I do it, they do it or anybody else does it; if it’s wrong, it’s wrong. We can do wrong and get on with our lives, but it’s still wrong. And so the idea that you can say just because everybody is doing it, it must be right… no, it can be wrong. But there has to be a standard of right and wrong somewhere. There has to be a basis of absolute. There has to be an absolute zero, and the Bible gives me that, and my Christian faith gives me that. It’s where I start my life from.

Denominationalism is probably the norm in America. You said something about “is our faith becoming more secular?” Yeah, I think so. And the more denominational influence we have, the more secular it becomes… When people disagree, they leave. And they want something that agrees with them. That’s something that in my faith, my understanding is we can’t leave the truth. We might not follow the truth, we might not do right, but the truth and right is still there. And denominationalism, in so many instances is “well I don’t like that, and we’re gonna change”. It waters it down, and changes the meaning. I hear so many times people talking about the bible, “well it’s all about how you interpret it”. No, the Bible has been interpreted, it doesn’t need to be interpreted. You can’t reinterpret something by changing its meaning; you can not like it, you can not agree with it, but when it says this is this, then that’s what it means. And that’s the way it is with so many things. We do that with so many things, especially in this country. Hard for me to speak of any other countries; I’ve got friends all over the world; Facebook has really helped me.

Do you think America is a Christian nation?

“I think it certainly would like to owe it’s start to being a Christian-minded nation. Is it any more? You know, it’s hard to say. The way that it’s set up: yes, I think it is. The way that we try to do our laws and policies are with the idea of what’s good for our fellow man, and I think that’s very Christian.”

See Jon's Full Answer

It certainly was founded as a Christian nation. It is set up as a Judeo-Christian nation, because so many of the things we can owe to Judaism in the way our laws are set up. So it certainly was founded as that. Is it a Christian nation? I think that because it was founded with the idea of freedom of religion, that you are safe to practice whatever religion… I think it certainly would like to owe it’s start to being a Christian-minded nation. Is it any more? You know, it’s hard to say. The way that it’s set up: yes, I think it is. The way that we try to do our laws and policies are with the idea of what’s good for our fellow man, and I think that’s very Christian. Yeah I think it still is. I think it’s getting further away from it; instead of freedom of religion, so much of the country is wanting to practice freedom from religion. I don’t know that it’s good to be a completely Christian nation. But I think the way that it was set up, was set up right. We are free to practice the religion that we choose, how we choose, and without any input from the government. How much of a role it should have… I don’t know. I think if we have good Christian people that are in office, that are in positions of authority, things will be ok. We’re all human, and there’s nothing perfect.

There’s just so many different things going on in the world, that everything cannot be cookie-cutter for everybody. And I think we’ve got to get away from this idea that one thing works for everybody. That’s where we are with so many things; our politics. “This way has to work”. It may work for some, it may not. There is nothing that you can set forth where you can say “this policy in this nation will work for everybody”. And that’s kind of the way it is with Christianity and being a Christian nation. You can’t force people to be Christians. The idea that, if you’re a Christian nation, you should force everyone to have that same belief… no. Someone forced to do something against their will is of the same opinion still. You change people’s minds by force. That’s what governments do; they try to do things that are supposed to be for the good of people, but they do it by force. If it was a good idea, people would do it.

Yes, I think we’re a Christian nation; I think Christianity plays a huge role in America in all aspects, but I would say that we want to believe that we’re Christians – the country does – but we don’t necessarily want to adhere to what it takes to be a Christian. We have so many different Gods; on Sunday, football is the God of the nation. We watch football instead of going to worship. An NFL game can draw 100,000 people, and a church service can draw 15. So, you can kind of take that for what it is… we’ve watered it down. Whether it’s an actual denomination, or whether we’ve just changed things to meet our wants, needs and desires, that’s what denominationalism is. You can belong to any church you want to, and that doesn’t dictate what kind of Christian you are. How you behave and hone your faith dictates what kind of Christian you are. I think that’s where we are as a country, and we also have so many other faiths and religions in this country, and people are free to do such. The right Christian that it’s important to allow that, and not force anything. You can’t force Christianity on anyone, that’s been tried and it doesn’t work.

How does faith impact politics in America?

“What I, as a Christian, like to see, is what policies… do the policies and does the overall direction of the government lend itself to be open to my Christian faith… one of the big things over the last 50 years here in America is abortion… the idea that abortion is government sanctioned and government funded goes against my Christian faith… the fact that it’s legal does not bother me as much as… Am I helping to fund it with my tax dollars? Am I participating in this?”

See Jon's Full Answer

Probably less than what people think or would like for them to. What I, as a Christian, like to see, is what policies… are the policies of a particular candidate or government… that’s one thing in America; we have so many different governments on so many different levels. We have a small town government in Cornersville, then we have a county government in Marshall County, then we have our state government in the state of Tennessee, then we have our federal government. There’s so many different layers of government. But what I like to see is, do the policies and does the overall direction of the government lend itself to be open to my Christian faith, to allow me to continue. Are there things that would be put in place that would go against it. And one of the big things over the last 50 years here in America is abortion. And the idea that abortion is government sanctioned and government funded goes against my Christian faith. Not the idea that it’s legal; of course as a Christian I would like to see it banned. I think it’s wrong, and my beliefs say it’s wrong. But, the fact that it’s legal does not bother me as much as “are the policies we have in place making it easier?” Am I helping to fund it with my tax dollars? Am I participating in this? I like to see candidates’ policies that move away from that. And that’s in so many areas; I’m not as focused on one thing as I am on the general direction.

How does [religion] play a role in our politics? I think we have had the wool pulled over our eyes so-to-speak so many times, when we have these people come to speak and the candidates talk about how good a Christian they are, and they believe… but then the policies are not. I think they use religion as a tool to help get elected. Of course, most politicians promise the moon and deliver very little. And I think that’s because government can’t deliver the things that it promises. Government can’t make you happy… government doesn’t do anything. They facilitate policies that allow for others to “do”. The government doesn’t have any money, it’s my money that they’ve taken from me. The role of government should be to do what people and the private sector can’t and won’t do. Protect the nation, the military, and even that, the government is not good at that. And if you don’t believe it, whenever there’s conflict, after the main military goes, who takes care of the rest? The private sector, like it or not. Blackwater. So they’re not even efficient at being the military. I’m glad we have a national military, but the role of government I think has been “we need to fix everything”, and it can’t. It’s just not possible.

Tennessee Sign

From the outside, the divisions in America sometimes makes it seem like it’s two nations in one. Do you agree?

“How can there be one set of policies, rules and standards that work all over the country. I’ve travelled all over the country and I’ve been to so many States… the Western, Eastern, Northern and Southern states. And things are different. People are different… What works for one area does not always work for another. The idea that we have to be dictated by a small group in Washington, is not practical.”

See Jon's Full Answer

I mean, I don’t know about two nations. But the idea that the same policies that work in NYC, or in any of the major cities, even within Tennessee – Tennessee is a relatively small state, but the things that work within Nashville, our state capitol, which is so heavy in business – is the same as for my area… we’re a very rural area. And rural and urban are completely different lifestyles, and things have to be different. We have different needs. Our education system here in America has become a one-size-fits all. We have a national education [secretary] in Washington; it’s a cabinet position. How can there be one set of policies, rules and standards that work all over the country. I’ve travelled all over the country and I’ve been to so many States… the Western, Eastern, Northern and Southern states. And things are different. People are different… What works for one area does not always work for another. The idea that we have to be dictated by a small group in Washington, is not practical. In the old days in America we had the small one room school house; every little community taught their kids what was important in that community. They taught them to read, write…. I do thing we need to expand out of that a bit more because the world is a smaller place now, and we have access to the whole world, but we still need to do the things that work in our communities. I think, in trying to make the world a smaller place, we have forgotten about community. We’ve gotten rid of individualism in so many things. And it’s always the individual that’s important. We’re not all about “let’s do for the greater good of the vast population”. It’s always the individual. Sure, the country is important, but you and I are important. And that’s what I hate to see; we have lost individual identities here in America, for Republican and Democrat. We’re no longer individuals. There’s some of us that don’t fit some moulds. I think that’s something that we need to step back and take a look at, and I don’t know if we can go back. I don’t know if going backwards is even possible any more.

It’s really good that people of differing cultures, ideas, and everything talk. Even here in America; where I’m from compared to someone who comes from New York City (NYC), they may have never been out of the city and seen green grass. I live on a 200 acre farm, and we own as far as you can see. It’s different. Circumstances are different. So what works for me may not work for you. What works in my country may not work in your country. To say that there’s one way that’s the right way for everything is pretty shallow and narrow-minded. And so I’m willing to listen and learn; not saying I’m always right; I don’t say things when I know I’m wrong…

That’s what really gets under my skin with some of these politicians. They talk about one answer for everything. There’s not an answer for everything. One of the big things in America is always the economy when there’s an election year. And it’s “ok, we need an economy for everybody”. Well, you can’t have an economy for everybody. You can’t have something that’s going to be good for everybody. If you make a rule, it’ll be good for some, and it’ll be bad, detrimental [for others]. There’s nothing that can be good for everybody outside of Jesus Christ and the Christian faith. And that’s my opinion, and you even have to be careful with that. The idea that there’s one answer is kind of a pie-in-the-sky thing. I think we have to be real careful. One of the things that does work is work. Everybody should be working towards something. When you have too many that are not working for anything, then that’s when the problems come in.

American Flag in Tennessee

What does conservatism mean to you?

“My idea of conservatism is that the individual is more important than the masses, and that I can provide better than the government can provide for me. To expect the government to be my sustainer of all things… then what’s my role?”

See Jon's Full Answer

My idea of conservatism is that the individual is more important than the masses, and that I can provide better than the government can provide for me. To expect the government to be my sustainer of all things… then what’s my role? I don’t want government handouts. Ultimately, where does the government get their money to do this? They get it from me. So I’m going to have to work, give them money, they’re gonna take their cut of it and give me a little bit of what I give them back. I give them a dollar and they give me a quarter back. That’s very inefficient, and it’s unnecessary, and you just don’t need all of that. My conservatism comes from my Christian faith; the Christian faith teaches us to do for others, not to tell others to do. One of the big differences of Conservatism and Liberalism in America… it’s not the end result – the end result is, I think, close to the same – it’s who is responsible. In Conservatism, we say “here, we will help people”. Liberalism says, “hey, the government should help people.” The trouble with the government helping people is they take money, and then inefficiently the have to pay… why can’t we just do it without that? If the idea from both sides is to help people, why don’t we just help people? Why do we need the government to force us? If you want to make somebody mad, force them to help somebody. People don’t like to be forced to do things; they rebel against it. They won’t do as good a job, they won’t help as much. If they want to do something on their own, they do much better. And so I think that’s the difference in a small, oversimplified way. That’s the biggest difference between conservatism and liberalism. It’s the idea of who should do the help, and which way is best. Jesus never taught us to give to the government so that we can help the poor. He taught us to help the poor. The Bible tells us that pure and un-defiled religion is to visit the widows  orphans in their infirmities.

“Religion that is pure and undefiled before God the Father is this: to constantly work alongside and for orphans and widows in their affliction, despite any costs, and to keep oneself unstained from the world.”

It’s not to give money to the government and let them help, and then say “we’ve done such a good job”. It means that you and I go out and do things to help our neighbour, help somebody. It also teaches about prayer, and says if you pray for somebody to be warm but don’t give them a coat, they’re still cold. We have to act on our beliefs. If we want somebody else to act on our beliefs [for us], do we really believe them? If you think it’s a good idea that everybody helps everybody else, but you aren’t doing it and expect the government to do it, do you really believe that you should be helping people? I think that’s where the big difference arises, and that’s the difference in conservatism vs. liberalism. You see this in churches all the time. This is why our church has become so watered down; we hire preachers and pay them big sums of money, and then tell them to go to the nursing home on Wednesdays, here’s the list of the sick you need to call. Why shouldn’t we go to the nursing home or to visit the sick. It’s good as a church to give money, because we can collect money and have more money to do good. But when it’s there for us to do, when somebody comes up to us at a gas station and says “hey man, you got 20 bucks?”, why should we send them to the church to get 20 bucks, or to a government agency? If we’ve got 20 bucks, give ‘em gas money. That’s how my faith translates into conservatism and government and government’s role. Government’s role should not take the place of what we should be doing. That in a nutshell is my position, and a lot of conservatives’ point of view and attitude towards the entire debate over conservatism, liberalism and government.

Do you consider yourself a Republican?

“I’m a conservative, not a Republican… I do vote Republican more than Democrat… there’s never been an election where, on some level – local, state, federal – I have not voted for both parties.”

See Jon's Full Answer

I’m a conservative, not a Republican. I’m not a registered Republican and I do vote Republican more than Democrat. I have voted Democrat; there’s never been an election where, on some level – local, state, federal – I have not voted for both parties. But, I do align with the Republican platform in that the platform itself is more conservative. The Republicans tend to be more conservative than the Democrats, and so I vote for the Republican because their policies tend to be more conservative. That gets into the presidential election, the idea of Trump. I’m not enamoured with Trump; I am not voting for Trump, the man. I quit voting for the man or person a very long time ago. If you think one person is the answer to everything, you’re setting yourself up to either be a fool or to be disappointed. As far as the shortcomings, we can go tit-for-tat of which individual has done more bad. Nobody is perfect, we’re all individuals and we all have problems. Would you want someone to go into your background and bring up everything you’d ever done? I know I wouldn’t, and I’m still considered by a lot of people that know me to be a pretty good guy! But I wouldn’t want people going into my background and everything that I’ve ever said, done or thought about. I go after the message, and Trump’s message from the beginning was: “Ok, the biggest answer to America’s problems is let’s put everybody to work, let’s get an economy where we have so many jobs that we don’t have enough people to fill ‘em”. Before the Covid hit, his administration was well on the road to doing that. We had more jobs available than we had people to fill them; the lowest number in almost every demographic of unemployment. Those are the things that answer people’s problems. If you have a job, if you have money then you can take care of things yourself. And we saw a lot of things headed in that direction. Then it got sidelined by this, and I don’t think this is any individual’s problem; it’s a virus. To think that we’re somehow God and that a government can stop a virus, I think, is ludicrous. It is what it is. It’s a pandemic, a virus, it affects a lot of people. I think we’ve kidded ourselves by saying that if we shut everything down it’ll stop. That somehow we can play God. It’s a virus, it’s gonna run its course. Yes, there are policies that we can put in place that we can do as individuals and collectively to help slow the spread of it, but it’s still going to be there. Even slowing the spread of it… you’re not gonna end it, in absence of a vaccine that kills it. And the flu has a vaccine, but it still kills 40-50,000 people a year. It’s one more thing, one more cancer of the world. It comes about because of man’s shortcomings, man’s fall from grace. That’s why we have all these problems. We’re always going to have them, and we’re never going to end them. That’s our punishment for being man, and for thinking we’re God. It’ why Satan was kicked out, because he wanted to play God. That’s man’s shortcoming, [we think] we know more than God.

Why are you voting for Donald Trump in the 2020 election?

“I’m voting for Trump because of the policies that he set forth and the policies he set forth are: “we’re gonna get the government out of the way and let you run the country.” …The idea that we need more government… I just don’t know what the government has done to help a lot of these things.”

See Jon's Full Answer

I’m voting for Trump because of the policies that he set forth and the policies he set forth are: “we’re gonna get the government out of the way and let you run the country.” We need businesses, we need jobs, and these things are what make the country great. The idea that we need more government… I just don’t know what the government has done to help a lot of these things. Yeah, we have to have rules to live by if we have a civilised society. You either have total freedom, or total control – authoritarianism, communism, whatever you want to say. And communism works perfectly if it’s 100% voluntary. We have some communes here in America, small groups of people who voluntarily give up everything and live together. And it works great! Until one person becomes the leader and starts dictating the terms. When it’s all voluntary and everybody wants to do the same thing with the same end-goal in mind, it works great. When we volunteer to live like that together, but then I tell you how to live, then it’s not voluntary and it doesn’t work.

If Donald Trump wins, or if Joe Biden wins, what do you think will happen after the 2020 election?

See Jon's Full Answer

What’s gonna be of the nation after the election? The same as before. I’m 48-years-old, and every election has been “the most important of our lifetime”. Have you ever heard of an election that wasn’t the most important? And yet the sun comes up tomorrow. The world keeps turning. Yeah, there have been detrimental effects from some elections; look at what happened in Germany with the rise of Hitler – very charismatic and he was the answer to everything. But overall in America, the sun is going to come up tomorrow, we’re going to be ok. Am I going to lose my job? No probably not, no matter who gets elected. Are things gonna change? Yeah, things will change. But things are gonna change no matter what. And to think that government somehow plays that important of a role in everybody’s life, I just don’t buy it. It just doesn’t. It’s just not as important. I think the general direction that our country goes will change, and it will change if the president is re-elected. I don’t think we’ll stay on the same course we’re on right now, and that’s because people change, circumstances change. From day to day, month to month and year to year. And to think that we’re always going to be on the same trajectory is just not right. It matters to me which direction the country goes; I’d like to see the country go and have more freedom from government, less government control and overreach.

Trump often does things that seem very “un-Christian”. As a religious person, did that make it difficult to vote for him?

“I think Donald Trump is exactly what he appears to be… he’s rich, he has a huge ego, I think he likes for people to tell him how rich and famous and good he is. I think he is in some ways an egomaniac, and I think he has developed through this election cycle somewhat of a cult of personality… Is that a good thing? I don’t know that it is. But I do think that he is a huge cheerleader for America… I like Trump, the administration, and not so much Trump, the man.”

See Jon's Full Answer

You can say that about every individual. You can say that about his opponents. I consider myself a Christian, but I can guarantee that there are some things I do and say that others, and even myself, would consider not very Christian. We’re weak and we’re human, we all make mistakes. Do I think he is an ideal Christian? No, I don’t. Who is the ideal Christian? We have the Christ. He was the ideal Christian. Everybody else is not, and we’re so far from it.

I think Donald Trump is exactly what he appears to be… he’s rich, he has a huge ego, I think he likes for people to tell him how rich and famous and good he is. I think he is in some ways an egomaniac, and I think he has developed through this election cycle somewhat of a cult of personality. He’s huge, and you look at the crowds that he can draw. I think probably the last time we had a government official that was this popular was John F. Kennedy. Trump is larger than life in so many ways. Is that a good thing? I don’t know that it is. But I do think that he is a huge cheerleader for America. I think he truly loves America. I think he loves what America stands for; the ability for the individual to become what they want to become. I think he is willing to do the things that are necessary to allow everyone that opportunity to enjoy the things that he’s enjoyed. I actually think that, of all the politicians that we have, that Donald Trump would feel more comfortable sitting down with the janitor than any other politician. One of the reasons is because his attitude is “everybody is important”. I guarantee that if he sat down with a group of janitors, that he would figure out a way for everybody in the room to make more money. That equals more jobs. I don’t think he’s perfect. I think he has a lot of flaws.

In America, we’ve seen almost four years of no new involvement in foreign wars, we’ve seen peace treaties between Israel and so many Arab nations. We’ve seen lots and lots of peace advancement. Everybody thought he was going to be a warmonger and we were gonna get into WWIII, but we’re talking with so many countries. I don’t know that that will stay… things change, but I know he hasn’t pursued military involvement around the world. He doesn’t believe America is the police for the world. He does think we need to get out and have less involvement. And he’s proved that with the policies and the actions that he’s taken. We have less of a military footprint around the world than we did four years ago. And so these are good things; these are things that we need to be working towards, in my opinion. Less military involvement; that’s what everybody around the world has said. And our president has been nominated three different times for the Nobel peace prize for things that he’s actually done for promoting peace. And the amount of news coverage that he’s gotten has been so minimal. Everybody wants to focus on Trump, the man. I think we need to get away from Trump, the man, and get to the policies and what he’s done. I’m proud of what he’s done. I think the advancements, especially in Middle East peace, is huge. I mean the Abraham accords that he’s done with Israel and the Arab nations is huge. This is a big thing. That adds to world stability… when there’s conflict in the Middle East it affects the world. There’s still conflict and problems, but I think there’s less, and I think we’re heading in a good direction with that. So these are why I like Trump, the administration, and not so much Trump, the man.

I don’t wear rose-coloured glasses; he is what he is, as a man. But I think he’s got the right policies of advancing America through businesses, manufacturing, through America first. A lot of people call him a nationalist for saying America first. But if you’re the president of a country, and you don’t have the interest of your nation first, whose do you have? Whose interests should you be advancing? He’s not the president of the world, he’s the president of the USA, and so he is trying to advance the interests and causes of America first. And that’s why I support.

What are some of the biggest misconceptions about Trump voters and conservatives?

“…it’s that the Trump supporter is shallow, uneducated, we don’t know what we’re talking about. And we’ve been called dumb by people running against Trump. And that’s not the case… for the most part the Trump supporters that are going to his rallies are successful businesspeople, hard-working Americans. They know what they’re doing.”

See Jon's Full Answer

I think one of the biggest misconceptions about the Trump phenomenon, is that it’s because he was a TV reality star. Donald Trump was a businessman. He is a multi-billionaire businessman. Yes he had a reality TV show, but that was a very small part of who he is. He’s a businessman. He runs businesses. Worldwide Donald Trump employed something like 25,000 employees. That’s huge… he knows what it means to run a business… yes he’s had failed businesses, but failure is part of winning. Nearly all successful sports stars failed more than they won, but that’s not what makes them popular.

One of the big things is that the Trump phenomenon is all about Trump, the man. It’s that the Trump supporter is shallow, uneducated, we don’t know what we’re talking about. And we’ve been called dumb by people running against Trump. And that’s not the case. Americans are not uneducated. Some are, but for the most part the Trump supporters that are going to his rallies are successful businesspeople, hard-working Americans. They know what they’re doing. Why do they support him? I’m not sure why everybody does.

 

The misconception about how uneducated the Trump supporters are, how shallow the Trump supporters are. That can be said about everyone. Look at the promises politicians make in order to garner votes. All you have to do is listen to ‘em. They make promises and it’s pandering; “if you vote for me I’ll do this”. Can you do that? For people to fall for this, “if you vote for me I’ll send everybody an Oreo cookie”, but you’re not going to do that. You’re not going to give everybody a job, you’re not going to make life better for everyone… or give everyone healthcare; you can’t do that. You can’t keep these lame promises. So the misconception of the Trump supporter is how shallow and uneducated we are. For the most part, we support Trump – and I’m going to go out on a limb and speak for a lot of others – we support Trump because of the hope that he will continue the policies that allow for Americans to do and become what we want to become. If we want to become rich, we can do that. If we want to become a 3-day-a-week worker, that’s fine too. Everybody doesn’t want the same thing. We don’t have the same goals. And so we like Trump because he says “whatever your goals are, I’m with you, I support that, and you’re free to do that without anybody telling you that you have to”. What really is mind-blowing to me is Trump’s popularity with everyone prior to him getting involved in politics. He has chosen to be a Republican, chosen to follow the conservative path in his politics. Prior to this, there’s probably more pictures of Donald Trump at events shaking hands and hugging on Democrats and liberals than there are with Republicans and conservatives. Now, my question is, they loved Donald Trump then, what changed? Did they love his money? Were they using him just for his money? Did they like him? Did they change because he ran against them? What changed? They call him a racist. Well they’re hugging on him, taking his money… was he a racist then and they were ok with it because he had money? Or is calling him a racist simply a political tool to try to get votes away from him. I don’t think Trump is a racist… the only colour he sees is green. He loves money more than anything else in the world. For goodness sake he’s dated black women… he doesn’t do things that are consistent with being racist. I don’t see any of his policies about being racist. And yet they call him that. And of course there’s so many words we use today in America… whether it’s true or not… it’s our culture that we’ve turned into of name-calling.

I think one of the biggest racist things in America is the idea that a minority of any kind should vote for a particular party because of their colour, because that party is the answer to their prayers. I think that is a racist, very shallow… minorities don’t need somebody to save them. There is one majority and everybody else is a majority. I’m a minority! White, Christian males are in the minority against everybody else. This idea that minorities are victims, I think we’re way past that. At one point in this country’s history, different groups have been victims of government policies of individual hate. But I think we’re so far past that. Individually, it still exists, but to claim that there is a big, vast conspiracy against any group in America I think is just wrong. I don’t think America as a whole is fighting against any one group. We’re fighting against ourselves. Maybe we have it too easy here. When times are hard, people don’t fight over little things. When times are good, we squabble over little, nitpicky things.

You mentioned individualism. Why do you worry about moving away from an individualistic society?

“…the further we get away from individualism, the further we get away from being who we are. Is that what’s at stake in this election? It’s always at stake. It’s not gonna happen in the next four years. But what policies will come about that will get us closer to being mindless, faceless people?”

See Jon's Full Answer

The individual is always more important. We’ve come full circle on this; individualism is more important than collectivism. Now, individually we make up communities, we make up societies, and so we have to learn how to act, behave and govern ourselves collectively. But we are still individuals. And so the further we get away from individualism, the further we get away from being who we are. Is that what’s at stake in this election? It’s always at stake. It’s not gonna happen in the next four years. But what policies will come about that will get us closer to being mindless, faceless people? I don’t know. I tend to believe to believe that the liberal policies move us further away from individualism. And they tell you this. Liberalism as a whole generally tells you that the village is more important than the person. I guess there’s some truth to that; there has to be some kind of an answer that fits both; how do we live individually and together. The more you look into this, the more you go back and read the Bible. This is nothing new. The record keeps playing over and over and over. The only answer is we live a good life, we believe in Jesus and when we’re done if we’ve put our faith in him, he calls us home. He’s our creator and giver of life, and when we’re done hopefully he brings us home. Everything in between is kind of inconsequential. Because we don’t go on how good or bad we’ve been; it’s all on faith in him, and faith in him alone. The older I get, the more I understand that, the more I understand how small we are, and yet how important we are. If the Bible is true, then what I’ve said is true. If I can help to bring one person to that faith, then how wonderful it is that I’ve changed the entire destiny of that person for eternity. That’s important, and I didn’t need any government to do any of that for me. If you want to be important, go somewhere, find someone in need… pay their electric bill, buy someone a new pair of shoes… do something to help somebody. You wanna know how important government is? Go and say, “hey, there’s government agencies that’ll help you”, versus pull out your wallet, and help em’ yourself. You’ll see which one is more important.

Is the government important? Yeah. Is it as important as me? No. It never will be. Government is me. We are the government. We pretend like government is this monster, this God that is bigger and better and above all things. And it’s not. It’s people, just like you and I. Donald Trump puts his pants on just like you and I. He doesn’t wake up and have a three-piece suit on. He has to get up, comb his mop of a hair… they’re people.

They lose that when you and I put them on a pedestal and say they’re more important than you and I. If you can get ‘em on a one-on-one and sit them at the table and eat dinner with them, and see that they eat and talk the same way we do, then they’re not more important than you and I. But when we leave it up to them to make up their own minds as to how to rule over us, then they’re gonna do whatever they wanna do. When we tell ‘em “no, you don’t rule over me”… Some of these Arab nations have these terrible authoritarian dictatorships. Their dictators use religion as an excuse. My friend in Afghanistan says they use that religion as a tool. They’re not religious; they claim to be religious zealots, but they use that… all they want is power. That’s what happens when you let governments rule, instead of govern. Governments should do what their name says: govern. What’s an acceptable speed limit? What should happen if somebody does this? But when they dictate every aspect of our lives, they’re ruling us. And in America, we had a war about that some time ago. And yet here we are, we’re back where we were then. It’s not over religion; that was the number one cause of the founding of America.

I often see Trump accusing Democrats of being Socialist. Why is Socialism such a bad word in America?

“It’s like the bogeyman of terms… I think it’s the concept that socialism is nothing more than what communism is born as.”

See Jon's Full Answer

It’s like the bogeyman of terms. I think it’s the concept that socialism is nothing more than what communism is born as. The idea that we need government-controlled everything.  In America, one of the big things that America has fought… has been we fought communism all across the world. Almost all the wars that we were in were to fight the spread of communism and to end that. And not so much the communism as what communism brings to society. What communism means to countries; the understanding that it’s not just government helping people, it’s government controlling, and then it’s government controlling by force. And then it’s forceful government control. And it’s knowing that it’s not just about getting free healthcare. It’s knowing that if we don’t do our part as dictated by the government, that somebody with a gun will be at our door to either lock us up or to force us to do all these things.

If you look at the countries around the World, in South America all these socialist countries… people leave there and do whatever they have to to come to America. People are not fleeing the United States to go to socialist countries. And yeah, America has tonnes, and tonnes of socialist programmes. I don’t think they’re beneficial, I think they’re inefficient; they can be done a lot better. They take a dollar and turn it into a dime in the name of helping everyone. I think it’s the underlying understanding of that; of how inefficient government-run programmes are. That they don’t multiply money. Government shrinks money when they take money from us to do programmes.

How much government do we in our lives to do good? If it’s good, won’t people do it? Do we need to be forced to do things? Where do we draw the line at what we’re forced to do? You can’t help somebody against their will. Why is drug rehabilitation so unsuccessful? We force people into rehabilitation. You know how people get clean? They decide to get clean. Yeah, they have to have help, but an alcoholic stops drinking when they want to stop drinking, not when someone else wants ‘em to. The whole socialist thing is, “we want to force people to stop drinking”. And they can’t. People are gonna misbehave. And if they spend all of their money misbehaving, is it my job to give ‘em more money? We have to send people money because they’ve wasted their money. They take their pay check on Friday, go to the bar or buy lottery tickets, and then have no money to pay their electric bill. In order for them not to be cold is it my responsibility to turn the heat on? There’s personal responsibility there somewhere. When we allo the government to do, we take away that personal responsibility. I think that’s one of the biggest things; the understanding the socialism and social programmes tend to do away with personal responsibility. We have to be accountable and responsible for ourselves, too. I don’t know that government has a role in making sure that we’re being responsible. I think there’s a deep understanding, or a deep fear, or both, of what socialism brings about. The more socialist a country guess, the worse conditions begin to happen in so many instances. You can just look around the world at that. Part of the reason is not because of the policies or the intent, it’s because of the ability to be abused by the small group of people in power. It’s always about abuse of power. Government is not bad because it’s government, it’s bad because people in positions of power abuse that position.

This whole deal that we have of America right now of the police… there are individuals in law enforcement of all kinds that abuse their position; always will be, always have been. You can’t erase that. It’s not policy abuse, it’s individual abuse. That’s what we have in government. And when you have a socialist government, where it’s the government’s responsibility to collect money and then redistribute that money for social programs when you have individuals who shave a little of the top, pay brother-in-laws’ companies a little extra. That’s where all the problems come in; the abuse. You can’t get around the abuse because it’s people. People are gonna do bad tings. You don’t have mother Theresa running everything. So I think that’s why socialism is such a bad word here. It’s not necessarily that we have a better understanding, it’s that our parents, our friends have fought and died all over the world, fighting the results of socialism, and we don’t wanna see that here. But we’re seeing it here; we’ve already seen it. We have it here. We don’t have the huge bad problems – the bread lines – yet. But when you have that kind of control by a group of people, it will come.

When a government collapses, in any country, there’s one thing that always takes its place. It’s the most pure form of economy that there is; it’s the black market. Capitalism. You have something, and I will trade you something for it. That is pure, capitalist economy right there. I’m not saying it’s perfect, but that’s the default when a government, an economy collapses. Capitalism in its purest form – black market capitalism – always comes in and takes its place. Because it works. “I have water, what will you trade for it”. “I have gas, I’ll give you that for it”. That’s true, free-market capitalism, and it works. It can be abused. But it works. So the understanding that capitalism has lifted more people out of poverty and kept more people from being destitute than anything else in the world… is that the answer to everything? No. But it sure answers a lot of questions. And that gets back to why I support Donald Trump. Jobs. He knows how to create jobs, he knows the policies that are necessary to be there or to be gotten rid of – regulations – in order to create jobs. Jobs help everything. You got a single mother that has three kids, you know what she needs more anything? A good job. When you have an economy where there are jobs, that helps so many areas and so many problems. I think the president has proven that he can create jobs. Look at the economy that this country had before Covid hit; we were there. It was the greatest economy probably that this world has ever seen. So, that’s why I support Trump. Not because of the man. He was able to put it into practice and do things. Was it perfect? No… the reason America became the superpower of the world was because of the industrialisation that America had during the 1800s and early 1900s… it had a lot of problems; a lot of pollution problems, child labour. But it lifted the entire country out of poverty, into being the superpower of the world… Even though some other countries – China, Russia – can get close to America in some certain areas, as long as America is what it has been and is today, they’ll never overtake America because of the idea of freedom; personal freedom. Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Nobody stands in our way of being happy, nobody stands in our way of trying to be a Donald Trump. China’s got a huge economy, but at the expense of what? Government control… is there happiness there? Probably not to the extent that there is in America. America is a great place; it’s where the world wants to come when there’s problems… We are the greatest country in the world. Will we stay that way? I don’t know, probably not. It’s not heaven on earth, I’m not mistaken about that. It has it’s problems. But as long as we have that hope of personal freedom to do and to become, we’ll always be the greatest country in the world. So that’s how it all kind of ties around to faith and politics, and lifestyle and everything. At the end of the day, that has been part of our downfall too. We’ve created a place that is so great, wonderful and happy, that we forget there are others in the world that don’t have it so good.

The Founding Fathers put in that our inalienable rights – life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness – come from our creator, not from our government. Our constitution was put into place not to tell the people how to work, but to tell the government how to limit itself. We had a framework put in place of limited government, not to interfere in the people’s business and lives. We have abandoned that to a large degree, and have layer upon layer upon layer of government regulations and government control. From our local, state, and federal governments, there’s so many contradictions. You can do one thing that’s legal on a local level, but is illegal on a federal level. Which one should you adhere to? When people want government to solve everything, that’s when we become hopeless. And when we become hopeless… hopelessness is a bad place to be. I’m sure you’ve seen it in your travels in bad places. The amount of hopelessness in the people’s eyes. And I’ve seen it here. And there’s no hope of it being any better. It’s a dark place. So much of the world is in that right now. And America is not, no matter who wins the election. The election is important, it’s the most important of our lifetime! Never been an election this important. The world will literally end tomorrow, the sun will not come up, if the election doesn’t go the right way! I think we should look at it, and laugh about it a little bit. If it doesn’t go our way, will it still be ok? Yeah, it’ll still be ok. But I think we all have to have an awakening of “it’s about me and you”. It’s still about the individual. We’ve gotta get back to that. The people are important. That pretty much sums up my philosophy on life.

With Trump behind in the polls, what do you think he can do to catch up and defeat Joe Biden?

“It’s been hard for me to believe that there’s anyone left that hasn’t made their mind up. The idea of there being undecided voters, I find that just remarkable… I don’t know that there’s anything that can be done now. I’m not sure that he is behind… Numbers say what you want them to say.”

See Jon's Full Answer

It’s been hard for me to believe that there’s anyone left that hasn’t made their mind up. The idea of there being undecided voters, I find that just remarkable… The Democrats have tried to make this election over the course of the last month solely on the Covid, and that Donald Trump is responsible for all the deaths. I think any reasonable person can look at that and say that it’s not his fault, and what can a government do to stop me from getting Covid? What’s Donald Trump, what’s Joe Biden gonna do? How are they gonna protect me? Are they gonna come and put a suit around me? I don’t know that there’s anything that can be done now.

What he should have focused on over the course of this year was his accomplishments. The media is so biased against Trump. If you look at some of the things… I read another thing this morning that’s new; another country has agreed to sign on with the peace accords between the U.A.E. and Israel.

If the media were reporting on the things that were actually happening with the administration, without a bias – you don’t have to put a spin and say if it’s good or bad – I think Trump would have been a whole lot more popular. I think the news put so much spin. Different channels… there are some that are so blatantly anti-Trump, and there are some that are blatantly pro-Trump. And that’s fine if it’s just a programme, but there’s not a news source that’s not unbiased here in America.

We can’t get the news to be reported without a spin on it. I think that has damaged his… that has made him look shallow because they focus on his rallies and his rally speeches. And that’s what they are; they’re pep rallies. He knows how to fire his base up. Do you think that’s how he’s acting when he actually gets into a room with the Israelis and these Arab countries and he’s brokering these peace deals? I don’t think so. Do you think that’s how he runs his billion-dollar business empire? No… he doesn’t have a reality show life. He had a reality show, and he knows how to ply TV star. Have you ever seen the clips of when he was on the WWE wrestling? That’s not who he is. He knows how to play that. He can play the part. But that’s not who he is. He knows how to get into a room in a three-piece suit and talk business, and he has brokered peace deals around the world!

These are big-time deals. Isn’t this what everyone says? “We need world peace!” He’s done that, to some degree! I don’t know to what degree, or how many lives he’s saved or how many wars he’s helped to avert, but I know we’re not involved in more now than we were four years ago. We’re in less. I think that has been a missed opportunity of this administration. He wanted to run on the economy, of how strong the economy was, which was smart. The lowest unemployment for all minority demographics in history. More jobs for minorities, in every demographic. I think those have been missed opportunities; that changed when everything stopped because of this Covid. And I think that Covid has been politicised. Governments, agencies have politicised this and tried to use it as a weapon, for and against. And that has hurt America.

I know people in businesses that have had to shut their doors. It’s bad. It’s easy to say “75,000 small businesses have shut their doors permanently”. But it’s different when you know ‘em… That was their life, that was their dream. Is it more important to shut a business down, to close a man’s livelihood at the hope somebody doesn’t get sick. I mean, the numbers speak for themselves. A lot of people have died with it, I don’t know that a lot of people have died because of it. Most have been deaths of people with underlying conditions. I’m not saying that Covid didn’t cause them to die, but they were in bad shape. So to close down a man’s business, life, at the hopes of somebody not contracting this, I don’t know that it’s worth it. If a person is sickly, is it my job to close my business so they don’t get sick? Why shouldn’t they just stay at home.

To answer your question, I don’t know that there’s anything that can be done now. I’m not sure that he’s behind… Numbers say what you want them to say. If I go out into my community, Trump is gonna win 99:1. Does that represent America? No it doesn’t. How do you get your numbers? That’s the part that they’re leaving out. Is he behind in the polls? Yeah, of the ones they’re taking. Do they represent America? I don’t know. They didn’t in the last election. I know I’ve never been called for one of these polls, for one of these surveys.

I guess time will tell; look at the Trump rallies as opposed to the Biden rallies. Joe Biden had a rally with Bon Jovi, and he was playing to 47 people and 12 pumpkins. That was the crowd. How does that translate into votes? I’m not sure. I do think that people who attend the Trump rallies will vote for Trump. I think a lot of people that don’t go to the Biden rallies will vote for Biden. So is that an accurate representation of how the election will go? I don’t know. We will see.

One of the biggest things that I think… if people look at this election and say “who will be the best to lead this country after the Covid back to peace and prosperity?” I think that the amount that says Donald Trump is not the right one would be a very small minority. In America, you have about 25% that are staunch left Democrats. Doesn’t matter who is running, what they’ve done, what they say, they will always vote Democrat. You have that many that are staunch Republicans. It doesn’t matter what they say, they will vote. Then you have about 50% that are the middle. They have a leaning, but they are willing to change.

20-25% are going to vote their party no matter what. Their identity is there politics. They are the problem with politics. They are unwilling to change, and to listen. The other 50% are the ones that should be running the country. Because they are willing, for whatever reason, to change their minds. They’re open-minded enough to change. Somebody that says “I’m gonna vote for Hitler if he’s the Democrat, or he’s the Republican…” …that’s dangerous. And it leads to bad politics. Those are the groups that we have that tend to run the country; the far left and the far right. We need the middle to be running in some ways.

But saying that I don’t like compromise. Compromise doesn’t work for me. It’s either right or wrong. You can compromise when the result is inconsequential. But a lot of times, compromise leaves everyone unhappy. “I want chocolate ice cream”, “I want vanilla”, “No, we’re gonna compromise and have strawberry”. Nobody is happy! So you shouldn’t compromise when it matters to be right or wrong. So I don’t like to see things get watered down. Compromise leads to denominationalism. And that’s kind of where we end up in politics and in this country. We compromise and instead of something being right, we compromise…

It’s gonna be interesting, I’m gonna stay up and watch it!

In your opinion, what’s the difference between liberals and conservatives in America?

“…in some ways the conservative voter tends to practice what they vote for, the conservative politician does not practice as much in their policies as what the voter wants them to. The liberal voters tend to not practice what they preach, but the liberal politicians tend to enact more liberal policies for the world to live by.”

See Jon's Full Answer

In a comparison of liberal vs. conservative, in America conservatives give more to charity than liberals. When it comes to personal giving, and this has been the case for years, conservatives give more to charitable causes than liberals. So a person has liberal ideas that everyone should be taken care of, but they don’t practice it. A conservative thinks everyone should be responsible for their own. And sometimes conservatives get a bad rap of “oh, you only care about yourself”. Well it is about self. We have self-responsibility. But conservatives actually give more to charity and charitable causes than liberals. And so, in the grand scheme of things, how is that reconciled in the policies. Don’t claim that you care more but you give less. If you care more, you give more, right?

You don’t advocate for policies… when you look at the climate and environmental discussions that are going on, you have these superstars that are advocating the use of bicycles, and they are willing to get on their personal private jet, and fly all over the world, and tell you and I to ride a bicycle. There are some that do practice what they preach. There are some personalities that preach doing this, and they themselves [do]. But most of them have their big entourage of SUVs and then tell us how to live. That reminds me of John Lennon. Everyone used to like to call him a great liberal mind. He wrote the song “Imagine”. Look it up and read the lyrics to the song, and what he’s advocating. But yet John Lennon had four houses. He’s advocating that we don’t have possessions, that we should live in a world of basically commune living, communism. But John Lennon had four different houses in four different cities. So he didn’t practiced what he preached. If you’re not practicing what you preach, then you don’t believe what you’re preaching. So this whole liberalism vs. conservatism… in some ways the conservative voter tends to practice what they vote for, the conservative politician does not practice as much in their policies as what the voter wants them to. The liberal voters tend to not practice what they preach, but the liberal politicians tend to enact more liberal policies for the world to live by. You get to a case of “do as I say, not as I do”. It’s like with the affordable care act under Obama; the government excluded themselves from having to live under that. If it’s good for the people, government should always have to live by the policies they enact. If government politicians and employees can be exempted from government policies, it’s a bad policy. They should always have to live under their own policies. So I think that’s one of the differences of conservatives vs. liberals, is practicing what we preach. And none of us practice as much as we preach; that’s pretty much a given. We all fall short.

Why a Religious Conservative Supports Donald Trump in 2020 #DonaldTrump #Trump2020 Click To Tweet

Why Jon Finley Supports Trump for President


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Life in Rural Tennessee - Jon Finley
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Attempting to cycle from Tromsø in Northern Norway to Baku, Azerbaijan while interviewing locals en route. Despite my chequered history with bikes, here’s to me returning home with an intact facial structure and at least as many body parts as I left with.

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