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2 months ago

Tieran Meets the World
Would you try a bath in Crude Oil? The latest episode of Tieran Meets the World is out now!People travel hundreds, and sometimes thousands, of miles to visit the clinics in Naftalan, Azerbaijan. Why? Because it’s the only place on earth where you can find a special type of crude oil, also called “Naftalan”. I’d heard about its supposed medical properties from locals I met on my cycle through the country, and had to check it out for myself. What awaited me was an entire town built on a totally bizarre industry; one that exists in a murky grey area outside of conventional medicine, but that claims to treat up to 72 different conditions. Workers at the clinics told me stories of miracle cures - of people visiting the clinics with crutches, and leaving without them - and some patients I met were there in the hope that they'd be able to treat conditions for which there is no known cure. But there isn't much research on the long-term effects of these baths, and what little there is seems to indicate that they might do more harm than good. To learn more about one of the strangest places I visited in a year-and-a-half on the road, watch the video below!www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-FtQ3zErro ... See MoreSee Less
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3 months ago

Tieran Meets the World
Episode 4 of Tieran Meets the World is out now! Did you know 20% of Georgian land is currently occupied by Russia? From the tranquility of the Caucasus mountains to civil unrest in the capital, my cycle through Georgia showed me two very different sides of the country. I trekked through isolated Svan villages, hitched a ride on a cattle-truck with my bike after a puncture, met Internally Displaced People (IDPs) who were forced to flee their homes during two wars for independence, and arrived in the capital as mass protests had erupted. I later learned that thousands of Georgians have been stuck living in limbo in abandoned Soviet buildings across the country. But why were they forced to flee their homes in Abkhazia and Ossetia, and what’s their link to the civil unrest that enveloped Tbilisi in 2019 and 2020?Have a watch at the link below to find out more!www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAr4rzf84OU ... See MoreSee Less
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4 months ago

Tieran Meets the World
Another adventure begins... 🚲🚲🚲On Saturday I hit the road with Jill for the first time in a year-and-a-half. Together we'll be cycling 4,000km around the UK, Ireland (covid-permitting), and to the Shetland Islands off the coast of Scotland for a movie date at the most remote cinema in the UK! 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿🇮🇪🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 Just like last time, we'll be documenting the stories we stumble across on the road and learning a bit about the different nations that make up the British Isles. I've often taken the UK for granted, so here's to exploring a little closer to home... Keep an eye out on here for updates, and wish us luck!P.S. have a gander at the first few episodes of Tieran Meets the World here www.youtube.com/channel/UC5JY_-lwYHTyPfBy3Q8ungQ ... See MoreSee Less
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5 months ago

Tieran Freedman
If you missed episode 2 of Tieran Meets the World, here it is again!What are the rules for Ramadan? Why do people fast? And what’s it like to cycle through Turkey during the islamic holy month? 🚲🇹🇷If you haven't already, have a watch at the link below to find out! ... See MoreSee Less
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5 months ago

Tieran Meets the World
Have you ever heard of Transnistria: the country that doesn’t exist?Episode 3 of Tieran Meets the World is out now!.Sandwiched between Ukraine and Moldova is a rogue state that declared independence from the latter in 1990, sparking an intense two-year conflict. It now has its own government, national flag, and even its own currency (the only one in the world that uses plastic coins). After cycling through Moldova in winter, I travelled to this relic of the USSR - where statues and busts of Lenin still dot the streets - and spoke to some locals to find out more.Have a watch at the link below (and check the video description for a link to an accompanying e-book)! ... See MoreSee Less
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5 months ago

Tieran Meets the World
Eid Mubarak! Ever wondered what it's like to cycle through Turkey during Ramadan? 🚲🇹🇷The second episode of Tieran Meets the World is out now!What are the rules for Ramadan? Why do people fast? And what’s it like to cycle through Turkey during the islamic holy month? If you haven't already, have a watch at the link below to find out! ———A hair-raising cycle into Istanbul, hitching a ride down a motorway on a tractor, and a holy month; arriving in Turkey certainly was memorable...I’d lost track of the number of times I’d questioned whether I’d make it this far, and as I stood at the edge of the bosporus strait, gazing across the choppy waters to the other side of Istanbul, it was impossible to resist the urge to smile. I’d cycled 4,500km through 9 countries and, at long last, I was finally on Asia’s doorstep.But beyond being a major milestone, my arrival in Turkey coincided with one of the world’s major religious periods: Ramadan. I’d known embarrassingly little about the Islamic holy month prior to my journey, considering where I was going and when, but that was about to change… ... See MoreSee Less
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5 months ago

Tieran Meets the World
The next episode of Tieran Meets the World is out now! 🇹🇷🎥Today is the last day of Ramadan before Eid, but what’s Ramadan actually all about?———A hair-raising cycle into Istanbul, hitching a ride down a motorway on a tractor, and a holy month; arriving in Turkey certainly was memorable...I’d lost track of the number of times I’d questioned whether I’d make it this far, and as I stood at the edge of the bosporus strait, gazing across the choppy waters to the other side of Istanbul, it was impossible to resist the urge to smile. I’d cycled 4,500km through 9 countries and, at long last, I was finally on Asia’s doorstep.But beyond being a major milestone, my arrival in Turkey coincided with one of the world’s major religious periods: Ramadan. I’d known embarrassingly little about the Islamic holy month prior to my journey, considering where I was going and when, but that was about to change… So, if you want to learn about the meaning of Ramadan, why people fast, and what it’s like to travel through Turkey on a bike during the islamic holy month, then have a watch of the latest episode of Tieran Meets the World at the link below! ... See MoreSee Less
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6 months ago

Olea Jensine Mosli Sæther
Tieran har stått på, og landa avtale med Tv2 Skole🌟 I dag har han premiere på sin webserie «Tieran Meets the World», og første episode handler om hvor koselige vi nordmenn er😇 Lik facebooksiden, følg instagram- og youtubesiden, del og se videoen🕺🏼 ... See MoreSee Less
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6 months ago

Tieran Meets the World
Episode 1 of “Tieran meets the World” is out now! I was woefully unprepared for a 6,000km cycle journey. At times it was near-impossible to see how I’d make it down to Germany, let alone cycle solo through Eastern Europe, across Turkey and to the Caucasus. I felt myself wearing down over time, and I spent night-after-night wide awake, my stomach in knots as I came to terms with my new routine. To be honest, if I hadn’t been in the middle of nowhere, with no option but to keep going in the early stages of the trip, I’d probably have returned home, broken by just a month of cycle touring. I never expected that it would be a drought and some forest fires that would flip the experience on its head. The lack of rain meant it was illegal to use our camping stove in the south of Norway, so we soon found ourselves abandoning our inhibitions and knocking on random Norwegians’ doors to heat up food. To say Norwegian hospitality caught us off guard is an understatement. Nearly every time we approached a local's home, we were offered a spot to camp in a garden or welcomed inside a house and given a bed for the night (which, in some cases, turned into a 2-3 day stay). Such spontaneous hospitality was a welcome break from the isolation on the road, and showed me a side of travel I’d never experienced before.———TLDR: Episode 1 is a glimpse of life on the road for a clueless brit with no cycling experience, and reveals a little about the cycle-touring aspect of the adventure…Have a watch at the link below to see how the kindness of strangers shaped my 6,000km journey from Norway to Azerbaijan ... See MoreSee Less
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6 months ago

Tieran Freedman
So excited to be releasing the first episode of my new web series, "Tieran Meets the World", tomorrow!! Until then and in case you missed it, here's the trailer for it one more time...-----In 2018, I set out on the adventure of a lifetime; a 6,000km cycle tour from Northern Norway to Azerbaijan, most of it solo. I didn't do it because of a secret passion for bicycles - in fact, I had almost no cycling experience at all. Instead, I’d decided to try to combine journalism with cycle touring; every mile pedalled, every mountain climbed, and every emotional breakdown endured, was in search of stories that I knew I’d never stumble across if I was travelling by car, bus, or train.Now, 13 countries and two-and-a-half years later, in collaboration with TV2 Skole, I’m finally starting to tell them, and will be hitting the road again in the Summer (covid-permitting)!So, if you want to explore the world from the comfort of your sofa, or just want to kill some time during lockdown, then keep an eye out for episode one tomorrow afternoon! ... See MoreSee Less
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6 months ago

Tieran Meets the World
Why on earth do people bathe in crude oil in Azerbaijan? What’s life like in a breakaway state in Moldova? And why have displaced people been living in an abandoned Soviet hospital in Georgia for 28 years? If you want to find out, or just want to see what it’s like to cycle 6,000km through some of the weird and wonderful places the world has to offer, then keep an eye out for season 1 of my web series, “Tieran Meets the World”!.In 2018, I set out on the adventure of a lifetime; a 6,000km cycle tour from Northern Norway to Azerbaijan, most of it solo. I didn't do it because of a secret passion for bicycles - in fact, I had almost no cycling experience at all. Instead, I’d decided to try to combine journalism with cycle touring. Every mile pedalled, every mountain climbed, and every emotional breakdown endured, was in search of stories that I knew I’d never stumble across if I was travelling by car, bus, or train. Now, 13 countries and two-and-a-half years later, in collaboration with TV 2 Skole, I’m finally starting to tell them, and I'm thrilled to announce that that episode one of my webseries will be out at the end of April! Find more on my YouTube channel at the link below:www.youtube.com/channel/UC5JY_-lwYHTyPfBy3Q8ungQ ... See MoreSee Less
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7 months ago

Tieran Meets the World
MASSIVE ANNOUNCEMENT!!My web series “Tieran Meets the World”, is coming soon to a laptop near you!! Watch the trailer at the link below 🚲🌍🎥

———Why on earth do people bathe in crude oil in Azerbaijan? What’s life like in a breakaway state in Moldova? And why have displaced people been living in an abandoned Soviet hospital in Georgia for 28 years? In 2018, I set out on the adventure of a lifetime; a 6,000km cycle tour from Northern Norway to Azerbaijan. I didn't do it because of a secret passion for bicycles - in fact, I had almost no cycling experience at all. Instead, every mile pedalled, every mountain climbed, and every emotional breakdown endured, was in search of stories that I knew I’d never stumble across if I was travelling by car, bus, or train. Now, 13 countries and two-and-a-half years later, in collaboration with TV 2 Skole/ Elevkanalen, I’m finally starting to tell them.So, if you want to explore the world from the comfort of your sofa, or just want to kill some time during lockdown, then keep an eye out for the first episode of season one!www.youtube.com/watch?v=89uF4jOOrng ... See MoreSee Less
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7 months ago

Tieran Meets the World
"Place Person Plate" is changing! Big announcement coming soon... ... See MoreSee Less
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12 months ago

Tieran Meets the World
Are you wondering why someone would vote for Donald Trump for president? Or what “conservative values” in America really mean? If so, have a watch of my interview with Jon Finley, a conservative American voter from Tennessee, who explained why his faith and values have led him to support Donald Trump for President in 2020. ... See MoreSee Less
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12 months ago

Tieran Meets the World
What caused the rise of right-wing nationalism in Poland? And why does Kajtek feel alienated by it?In Wrocław, I spoke with Kajtek, who told me that the rise of nationalism was his biggest concern for his country. To hear his thoughts, have a watch at the link below!P.I.S., the political party currently governing Poland, has purged the judiciary, recently introduced a highly restrictive abortion law, promoted the idea of LGBT-free zones, and spread anti-immigrant rhetoric. For many young people, it's extreme and authoritarian, and has left them feeling alienated. But to some others, it represented an opportunity for change that they feel Poland needed. Regardless, it's hard to deny that an increase in Polish nationalism played a part in propelling them into power. ... See MoreSee Less
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1 years ago

Muhammet Ali Ateş
www.youtube.com/watch?v=iXzGremVNgU&t=336sKomrat'ta evimizde misafir ettiğimiz Tieran Freedman (The Place, The Person, The Plate) ve onun Komrat gezisini içeren videosu. ... See MoreSee Less
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An endangered language, my first punctured tyre after 4000km, and the Black Sea... The next part of the Arctic to Asia Cycle Tour is up on YouTube!.Did you know Moldova has a Turkic region where people speak an officially endangered language?I was miles off the beaten path, heading for the Black Sea coast and stopping at a cultural island along the way.I cycled to Gagauzia, a culturally unique and autonomous region in the South of Moldova with a totally separate identity to the rest of the country. The Gagauz language is very similar to old Turkish, and Turkey considers the culture similar enough that the government has attempted to create a sphere of influence there, funding the construction of schools and hospitals. That wasn’t necessarily the way locals saw it, though, and most expressed a fierce cultural independence whenever I asked them about what it means to be Gagauz.After several days, I left Gagauzia and Moldova behind. I crossed the border to Romania and, finally, made my way to the Black Sea. It was a MASSIVE milestone on the trip, and cycling along its coast as I headed south reminded me of just how far I'd travelled. A Massive thank you to Ali and Rukiye for hosting me in Gagauzia (Ali even acted as translator for one of my interviews), to Olga for teaching me about Gagauz culture, and to Lidia for finding me a place to stay in Galati!Have a watch at the link below! ... See MoreSee Less
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Winter dragged on, but the snow retreated into the North, leaving behind a bleak and muddy Moldovan countryside, and I considered that maybe February wasn’t the best time to be visiting by bike. But after a few cold and exhausting days (and an attempted roadside robbery) I trundled into Chișinău, where I’d be hosted by two locals, Alex and Marina.I’d been dying to reach Moldova’s capital for a less obvious reason; 60km from the city lies a bastion of Soviet architecture and influence that has clung on while the world around it changed. Transnistria (aka the Pridnestrovian Moldavian Republic, aka “The Country that Doesn’t Exist) declared independence from the rest of the country in 1990, sparking a war that went on for two years. The border is now manned by Russian peace-keepers, whose arrival put a stop to the fighting in the ‘90s. So, before I continued South to the Romanian border, I hopped on a bus to check out the “little USSR” for myself.Have a watch at the link below! ... See MoreSee Less
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Have you ever wondered what life was like in East Germany before the fall of the Berlin wall?Petra Wiezer grew up in the communist G.D.R. (German Democratic Republic). I met her in Rauen, a small village some 60km East of Berlin, where she sat down with me to talk about her experience living in a country that no longer exists, including her run-in with the secret service, and the West's misconceptions about the nation she once called home.Have a watch at the link below!Rauen, Brandenburg, Germany ... See MoreSee Less
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I was exactly where I’d tried not to be; Ukraine in the depths of winter, attempting to figure out how to get my bike through the snow to the Moldovan border…The next part of the Arctic to Asia Cycle Tour is up on Youtube, have a watch at the link below!.After a couple of rides over snow-covered roads, courtesy of some friendly locals, I finally crossed the border into Moldova. Before long, the country’s peculiarities began to reveal themselves. The noisy complaints from my bicycle were joined by the clip-clopping of horses and carts carrying farming supplies, audible long before they were visible, which seemed to materialise from thin air, and countless wells, known as “fîntînă”, beautifully decorated with intricate and complex patterns, lined the streets of villages..I felt isolated; most locals I spoke with had never met anyone from England; the few who do visit the country mostly go to the capital, Chișinău, and rarely venture into the surrounding countryside. There was a sense of mystery, of true exploration that I hadn’t felt before, and one that would remain for the next 4 weeks as I made my way South..A huge thank you to Taras and Kate for saving me from cycling along one of Ukraine's busiest main roads in a snowstorm, and to Justine and Maddie for hosting me in Bălți! .Shoutout to everyone else who appears in this video for making the trip what it was: Darren Alff (Bicycle Touring Pro), Yurko, Аліна, Denis ... See MoreSee Less
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"Scandinavian Socialism" is often bandied about in the media, but do you ever wonder what those who actually live under the Nordic model think of it?In Trondheim, Central Norway, Nippe and Hege Fossland told me their thoughts on Norway's welfare state. Have a watch at the link below! ... See MoreSee Less
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Ukraine, Ikraine, we all Kraine.The next part of the Arctic to Asia cycle tour is up on YouTube!.I knew very little about Ukraine before I arrived so I had no idea what to expect from this part of the journey. To be honest, my excitement was mixed with a little nervousness after so many of my hosts and friends warned me to be careful once I'd crossed the border, with one Ukrainian expat quipping that cycling in Ukraine "sounds like a good way to get your legs broken"..Nonetheless, it was a big moment; at long last, I was leaving Poland, and with it the EU/Schengen area..As luck would have it, just three days after my arrival, a conflict between the Ukrainian and Russian navies led to the declaration of martial law across large swathes of the country. It was a tense time to be visiting, but I was well-looked after by two locals, Yurko and Romana, while I waited in Lviv for things to blow over..Have a watch at the link below!.A big thank you to everyone who appears in this video for yet more amazing hospitality (Yurko, Romana, Oleksandr, Olena)! ... See MoreSee Less
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The next Arctic to Asia video diary is on YouTube! Have a watch at the link below 🚲🚲.As autumn began slipping back into winter, I pedalled as fast as I could towards the Ukrainian border, hoping to outrun the inevitable arrival of the snow. .I left Kraków and made my way into the foothills of the Carpathian mountains before the temperature plummeted; the days were getting shorter and shorter, and I found myself cycling through icy darkness day after day..The freezing weather and dwindling daylight brought new challenges, but after long days shivering on the bike traversing Poland's quaint country lanes, I ended up warming myself by fireplaces on farms and in cabins, getting to know local people, and seeing what life was like in Eastern Poland..-----------------A massive thank you to everyone who features in this video for the incredible hospitality:Janusz and his family at Farma KozłówekGrażyna, Klaudia, Izabela and Andrzej at Chata na końcu świataHenryk and Maria at Słomiana Chatka, the house Henryk built from scratch, in Wesoła ... See MoreSee Less
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1 years ago

Tieran Meets the World
Would you ever live on a ferry?.Four years ago, Torben and Dorthe secured the purchase of the 'Svendborgsund', and began a project: turn a decommissioned car ferry, built in 1947, into a home. Since then they have completely gutted the inside, renovated it and converted it into a houseboat that now sits on one of Copenhagen's canals..The old deck that used to house up to 12 cars now functions as their living area and kitchen, and they sleep down below in the "engine room".. They didn’t pick just any ferry, though; this was the one that Dorthe used to take regularly in the south of Denmark when she was a child!.Hands down the coolest house I’ve ever visited….--------------For interviews and articles from the Arctic to Asia Cycle Tour, visit: www.placepersonplate.com/Instagram: www.instagram.com/placepersonplate/YouTube: www.youtube.com/placepersonplate/ ... See MoreSee Less
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Part 8 of the Arctic to Asia Cycle Tour is now up on YouTube!I was almost 2 months behind schedule, but I put timing aside as I slowly soaked up Poland's charm on the way from Czestochowa to Kraków.I was fortunate enough to be there for All Saints' Day, when thousands of candles light up churchyards dotting the countryside. Visible from miles away, the dazzling displays of flickering light remain one of the most beautiful things I’ve ever seen. Have a watch at the link below!P.S. A big thank you to Wojtek, Dorota and their family for hosting me for 4 nights in Podlipie, and a shout out to everyone else that appears in this video (Jarek, Agata, Marina, Bronte) who helped make this trip what it was! ... See MoreSee Less
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1 years ago

Tieran Meets the World
With a steadily leaking tyre, I rolled around twists and turns on my way to the Comrat, passing nothing but tiny villages, marshland, and a farmer leading a donkey. At last, a Moldovan flag, fluttering beside another, less familiar one above a sign welcomed me to yet another one of Moldova’s oddities. I was now in an enclave with its own unique culture, Turkic language, and no written history; the Gagauz Autonomy..Just past a labyrinthine Turkish-style market hidden under corrugated iron panels in the centre of Comrat, my host, Ali, emerged from an apartment block to greet me. He helped lug my stuff up an endless flight of stairs to the top floor, and introduced me to his family..For the next 4 days, they showed me around, introducing me to their Gagauz friends and the local culture. Luckily, since Ali was Turkish, he was able to speak the language (Gagauz and Turkish are about 95% the same) and acted as a translator for my interview with Olga (link at end of post) and another one with his friends, Lidia and Elena! .4,000km on the road and I still hadn’t learned how to repair a punctured tyre, so Ali also took the time to walk me through the process; a long overdue lesson that’d prove extremely useful later in the trip..A massive, and as always very late, thank you to Ali, Rukiye and their kids, Hamza and Zeynep (they've also since welcomed a new addition to the family; their daughter, Meryem), for the incredible hospitality, amazing food, and for inspiring me to take a massive detour to travel through Turkey! It was an fantastic way to say goodbye to Moldova before I headed South into Romania; Teşekkür ederim 😊🚲.------------Read my interview with Olga about what it means to be Gagauz: theplacethepersontheplate.com/gagauzia/ ... See MoreSee Less
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Finding someone who spoke any English was a rarity in the Moldovan countryside. Most of my communication was done through google translate when I had service, or through the medium of mime when I didn’t. So, I was caught off guard when, just outside Edinet, in a hotel in the middle of nowhere, a guy cleaning his teeth at the sink next to me in the hotel bathroom while I did the same turned to me and said, in perfect English, “hey, I saw you cycling past us earlier, where are you from?” .Thrilled to be able to have a fluid conversation with someone, I took the opportunity to chat. It turns out he was from Chișinău, but was running an ultramarathon down the entire length of Moldova, a feat him and his sports club attempt every year! .Since he had a spare flat that him and his wife weren’t using, he told me to contact him when I arrived in Moldova’s capital and that I was welcome to stay there. As well as giving me a warm bed, they even took me wine- and sherry-tasting, out for several meals, and to the world’s largest wine-cellar; Mileştii Mici. So, a huge late thank you to Alex and Marina for the incredible hospitality; Mulțumesc!--------------For interviews and articles from the Arctic to Asia Cycle Tour, visit: www.placepersonplate.com/Instagram: www.instagram.com/placepersonplate/YouTube: www.youtube.com/placepersonplate/ ... See MoreSee Less
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The next short "moments" video is up on YouTube! We headed through Norway's Nordland province, and inched ever-closer to the edge of the Arctic Circle...Our plan had been to cycle to the tip of the Lofoten islands before taking a ferry to Bodø and heading south, but the never-ending stormy weather meant that we decided to head for the mainland early before cycling further south.Have a watch at the link below! ... See MoreSee Less
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Part 7 of the Arctic to Asia cycle tour is now on YouTube!I'd been cycling solo for a month, and was finally getting to grips with being alone on the road. Autumn was catching up with me - and the more stormy, challenging conditions that came with it. But my spirits were climbing higher and higher as I headed through Western Poland, largely thanks to the kindness I received from the locals I crossed paths with along the way. .This leg of the journey took me around 250km from Lubin to Częstochowa, with a stop in Wrocław en route and a two-day trip home to surprise my grandad for his birthday (shoutout to Kajtek, who I didn’t get on film, for looking after my things while I was gone)! .A big thank you Janusz, Małgorzata and their family at the Buffalo Ranch in Dabrówka Dolna, Opole, Poland, and to Jarek in Czestochowa for hosting me!.Have a watch at the link below! ... See MoreSee Less
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2 years ago

Tieran Meets the World
Throwback to when we were still allowed to have fun outside, and we were cycling across the Atlantic road; one of the first major milestones of the trip. We were out of the Arctic circle, the weather had FINALLY turned for the better, and it was a stunning place to say goodbye to the ocean before we turned to cut inland towards Oslo!You can find more videos from the adventure over the past year-and-a-half on my YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/placepersonplate/ ... See MoreSee Less
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Part 6 of the Arctic to Asia cycle tour is now up on YouTube!.After struggling to keep it together on my way to Berlin, I headed for Poland. Along the way, the hospitality of the people I met helped me forget about the loneliness and isolation that had been overwhelming me, and I finally started to truly enjoy my time on the road solo. .I’ve been putting off recording a voiceover/narration for this for a long time, but, now that the world has gone into lockdown, I’ve run out of excuses….Have a watch at the link below!.P.S. For reference, I'm making that face because my bike has just broken in the middle of nowhere, stranding me in a Polish forest at night. .Massive thank you to everyone who features in this video:Clemens, Petra and their family in Rauen, Brandenburg, Germany, and Greg, Marek, Sławomir, Paweł, and Andrzej in Nowa Sól; you guys made this part of the trip unforgettable 😊🚲 ... See MoreSee Less
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The last thing I expected to be doing in Balti, Moldova, was feasting on nachos and watching the Super Bowl, albeit on a livestream through someone in the USA’s Instagram story, but somehow I managed to stumble across Moldova’s only “little America”....So, a huge and very, very late thank you to Maddie and Justine, who were volunteering with the American Peace Corps, for letting me take up their entire living room floor for 4 nights, introducing me to Toamna and Zapada (their creatively-named cats), and organising a fascinating interview with Marina Skaletskaya! Mulțumiri! 😊-----------For interviews and articles from the Arctic to Asia Cycle Tour, visit: theplacethepersontheplate.com/ ... See MoreSee Less
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2 years ago

Tieran Meets the World
Once again, I find myself scrambling to catch up on long overdue thank you posts from my time on the road over the past year-and-a-half. Winter in Moldova isn’t exactly cycle-friendly, and my days on the bike consisted of slipping and sliding through slush, frigid air burning my lungs, and the loss of feeling in my hands and feet after about an hour. As I raced south to escape the snow’s clutches, I jumped at every opportunity to get inside for for a break from the cold. So, a big shoutout to Vasilii, who invited me into his shop near Edinet with his friends, Denis and Vitalii, warmed me up with tea and refuelled me with a sandwich on a frigid February afternoon. Mulțumesc!--------For interviews and articles from the Arctic to Asia cycle tour, visit: theplacethepersontheplate.com/ ... See MoreSee Less
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2 years ago

Tieran Meets the World
MASSIVE ANNOUNCEMENT!!!The eagle-eyed among you might have noticed things have been very quiet on this page recently. Now I’m finally able to provide an explanation:I’m absolutely thrilled to announce that I’ve just finished sorting out an agreement with TV 2 Skole to turn the Place, Person, Plate interviews into learning resources for Norwegian schoolkids! .What does this mean? In short, “The Place, The Person, The Plate” has secured FUNDING! So, more interviews, more adventure, and more insight into the lives of everyday people around the world. .Now that I've finally reached Baku, TV2 Skole has asked me to cycle round the UK and Ireland later this year. Along the way, I’ll be speaking to locals about “identity”, which will be especially interesting in the current social and political climate, so keep an eye out!.I’ll try to keep posting on the website and this page as much as possible, but things will continue to be a little more sporadic than they have been over the past year-and-a-half. I still have tonnes of interviews, photos, videos and belated thank you posts to put on here, but for now a huge thank you to everyone who’s supported me on this ridiculous project and helped me come this far; hopefully there is much more to come! 🚲🚲🚲---------------------For interviews and articles from the Arctic to Asia Cycle Tour, visit: www.placepersonplate.comElevkanalen's website (a branch of TV2 Skole): www.elevkanalen.no ... See MoreSee Less
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2 years ago

Tieran Meets the World
In Norway, the month before your final exams at videregående (college) you become "Russ". This means celebrating finishing 13 years of school by partying in buses, vans and "walking groups", usually from the 20th of April until "Norwegian Constitution Day" - the 17th of May..Some save money for up to two years to be able to afford the flashiest bus and take part in the celebrations. While studying for exams, many will drink almost every day and have special Russ festivals. During this time, russekort (russ card) collection becomes something of a temporary hobby for many, especially children..In the photo, Sindre can be seen modelling his old "Russedress" which, according to Russ rules, you are not allowed to wash and have to wear whenever you leave the house, 7 days a week during "russefeiring". .The colour of the uniform indicates what kind of subject you studied; red is for regular school, blue for economics and politics, black for subjects like mechanics and carpentry, and green is for agriculture. This is a unique celebration to Norway and, according to Sindre and his father, Anders, is very much approved of by parents, despite the fact that it often ends in someone dropping out of school....-------------------.For interviews and articles from the Arctic to Asia Cycle Tour, visit: theplacethepersontheplate.com/ ... See MoreSee Less
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After 2 weeks of cycling in Norway with barely a glimpse of the sun, we finally had our first clear day!In place of an interview this week, here is another "moment" from mine and Miriam's journey across the island of Andøya in Northern Norway, complete with clips that (mostly) didn't make it into the final version of "Arctic to Asia part 1". Have a watch below!youtu.be/SwKaerU76_o ... See MoreSee Less
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On Thursday, I spoke with an Azerbaijani news network, and it seems I was accidentally transported back to the 1980s. .A short disclaimer: despite how it may look, I absolutely did not wink at the interviewer at any point during the interview....You can find the full video below (though it is dubbed in Azerbaijani)!www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZVPBDwgToQ ... See MoreSee Less
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2 years ago

Tieran Meets the World
Once again, I found myself at the mercy of winter in Chernivtsi, Ukraine. Slush had turned to ice at the roadside, and I’d begun googling how to make improvised snow tyres so I didn’t slip on the busy highway that would take me out of the city towards Moldova. But just as I was about to venture into the frigid conditions outside Аліна (Alina), who worked at the hostel I’d been staying at, came to the rescue. So a massive and very late thank you to her for insisting that I load my bike into her car so she could drive me out of the city to the Moldovan border, saving me a nerve-wracking few hours navigating traffic on a snow-covered road! Дякую (Dyakuyu)!--------------------------For interviews and articles from the Arctic to Asia Cycle Tour, visit: www.placepersonplate.com ... See MoreSee Less
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Part 5 of the Arctic to Asia Cycle Tour is now up on YouTube!.The adjustment to cycling alone almost broke me. At times, the loneliness was overwhelming and I'd struggle to see how I'd last a month, let alone a year, on the road by myself. .It wasn't the isolation in the moment that bothered me, but the creeping sensation that this is what life would be like for the next year. By the end of the first day, I was already thinking of how I'd have to explain to my friends and family that I hadn't been able to handle it and had to quit and come home..So have a watch of me getting to grips with solo cycle touring as I traversed the banks of the river Elbe from Hamburg to Berlin at the link below! ... See MoreSee Less
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The bad news: the next Place, Person, Plate interview from Romania won't be published until next week.The good news: That's because we've been flown to Paris to film for a TV show!Instead, here is the latest "moment" from the Arctic to Asia Cycle tour, when Miriam and I were stranded on Senja in Northern Norway after a storm blew in. Enjoy! ... See MoreSee Less
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